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The City of Titusville, Florida / Community Development / Community Redevelopment Agency / Urban Design Manual



caption>Marquee sign
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

Close-up of map area showing Titusville's Civic Waterfront District.
 
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

Architectural Style

This district has the richest residential architectural history and expresses Titusville’s cultural history. Most buildings are single family residential. Influential styles include:  Photo of a house typical of the Historic Residential District of Titusville   Rendering of a house typically found in Titusville's Historic Residential District.
Photo of a house in the Historic Residential District of Titusville.  Typical design of a house in the Historic Residential District.
 
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

Style

Massing and Siting

Materials

Photo of a white house. (Photo by Old Northeast Walks)
Photo by Old Northeast Walks
Photo of a green house. (Photo by Old Northeast Walks)
Photo by Old Northeast Walks
Photo of a multi-story green house.   Photo of a light blue house with stairs leading up to it.
 
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

District Edges

Development on blocks adjacent to another District or the CRA boundary should reflect a transition in height and density. Where the two districts’ boundaries intersect, there should be no more than 30’ of building height difference between the adjoining districts. Mid-block changes in height and bulk should occur to relate to the adjacent district.

The blocks that border the Downtown District should step up in height.  The blocks that are adjacent to the Midtown District should be 2-3 stories.

Uses on these two district edges are an appropriate location for small multi-family buildings within the Downtown and Midtown Districts.

Photo of a three-story brick apartment building with cars out front.   Photo of the Broome Law Firm building in Titusville.
Photo of a brown house with people on the front porch. (Photo by Kimke)
Photo by Kimke
 
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

Retail Identity

Architecture

Materials

 Photo of a multi-story building with bottom floor stores and cars out front.   Photo of a restaurant with tables outside.Photo of people walking through a colonnade.
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Map
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Architectural Style

This district is largely suburban in nature. These styles include architecture suited for auto repair shops; industrial buildings; auto sale lots; frame, brick vernacular, bungalow and mission style homes housing either residential or commercial uses.

Photo of a two-story retail building in Titusville's Midtown District.   Photo of a car dealership in the Midtown District, with a stylized angular covering.
A white mission-style home in the Midtown District of Titusville.   Photo of a motel in the Midtown District of Titusville.
Photo of an older mission-style building in the Midtown District of Titusville.
 
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

Style

Massing and Siting

Materials

Photo of a multi-story brick building with an elevated walkway leading to doors.   
Photo of a concrete and glass, multi-story building with trees and cars in front. (Photo by La Citta Vitta)
Photo by La Citta Vitta
 
Photo of a Smart car dealership, with a yellow Smart car parked in front. (Photo by Bergstrom)
Photo by Bergstrom
Photo of existing retail building before any renovation.
Existing Conditions
Artist rendering showing the same retail building after a theoretical renovation.
After storefront renovations, addition of street trees and landscaping, and development of a plaza.
 
 

Midtown District Guidelines

District Edges

Development on blocks adjacent to another District or the CRA boundary should reflect a transition in height and density. Where the two districts boundaries intersect, there should be no more than 30’ of building height difference between the adjoining districts where boundaries include a right-of-way. 

Buildings on the edge of the Downtown District should be 3 stories in height to relate to the buildings in the Downtown District.  Any lot that abuts a single family home in the Historic Residential District can be no more than 3 stories in height. These lots should also include a landscape buffer adjacent to the District boundary.

Architecture and access should respect the residential nature of the adjacent District.
Photo of a mult-story retail building along a city street.   Photo of a multi-story retail building along a street lined with cars.   Photo of a multi-story brick apartment building with cars parked along the street in front and  police car nearby.
Photo of a three-story retail building on a city street.   Photo of a multi-story retail building on a city corner.   Photo of a three-story office building on a city corner.


 
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Retail Identity

Architecture

Materials

Photo of a large retail store at a busy intersection.    Photo of a retail building "The Container Store" with cars parked out front.
Photo of people walking under a colonnade while shopping.   Photo of an exotic car dealership on a city corner.

 
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Signage Idea Gallery

Signage allowed in Midtown:
Photo of a Buick marquee sign.
Marquee sign
Photo of a monument sign on dirt.
Monument sign
Photo of a large monument sign with a dragon fly element attached, saying "Discovery Center & Murfee Spring Wetland."
Monument sign
Photo of a monument sign made to look like stacked blocks with letters on them.
Monument sign
Photo of a window sign that says "Barnlight Electric."
Window sign
Photo of large monument sign with a Ford logo on top, which reads "Shanahan."
Monument sign
Photo of a monument sign with yellow on it and an M for Metro. (Photo by La Citta Vitta)
Monument sign (Photo by La Citta Vitta)
Photo of a monument sign with a silver rectangle and the words "700 Drayton food|music|drinks."
Monument sign

 

Approved Native Plant List of the City of Titusville

Street Trees:

Featured Palms:



 For a printed copy of the Urban Design Manual, please contact Tim Ford at 321-567-3860 or timothy.ford@titusville.com.

Photo of front door to Barnlight Electric Building in Downtown TitusvillePhoto of The 

Downtown Gallery and other buildings in Downtown TitusvillePhoto of the Hardware storefront and 

other buildings in Downtown Titusville.

 A City with No Limits 

Titusville Urban Design Manual


 

TABLE OF CONTENTS

  1. A​cknowledgement

  2. Introduction

    1. Value of Titusville

    2. Purpose

    3. Guiding Principles of the Urban Design Manual

    4. Goals of the Urban Design Manual

  3. Architectural Styles

  4. Retail

    1. Elements

    2. Guidelines

    3. Guiding Principles

    4. Illumination

    5. Awnings and Canopies

  5. Signage

    1. Guiding Principles

    2. Signage Types

    3. Signage, Public Art and Illumination Guidelines

  6. Sustainability

    1. Shade and Ventilation Design

    2. Ground-based Stormwater and Runoff

    3. Roof Stormwater and Runoff

  7. Landscape

    1. Streetscape Landscape Standards

    2. Typical Lanscape Zones

    3. Buffer Landscape Standards

  8. Street Furniture

  9. Design Review Authority and Process

  10. District Map

  11. Uptown District Guidelines

    1. Architectural Style

    2. Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

    3. District Edges

    4. Retail Identity

    5. Signage Idea Gallery

  12. Downtown District Guidelines

    1. Architectural Style

    2. Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

    3. District Edges

    4. Retail Identity

    5. Signage Idea Gallery

  13. Civic Waterfront District Guidelines

    1. Architectural Style

    2. Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

    3. District Edges

    4. Retail Identity

    5. Signage Idea Gallery

  14. Historic Residential District Guidelines

    1. Architectural Style

    2. Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

    3. District Edges

    4. Retail Identity

  15. Midtown District Guidelines

    1. Architectural Style

    2. Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

    3. District Edges

    4. Retail Identity

    5. Signage Idea Gallery

  16. Approved Plant List


 

Acknowledgements

Cooper Carry company logo Copyright 2010
Cooper Gary

Kimley-Horn and Associates company logo
Kimley-Horn and Associaties, Inc.

Lawandales Planning Affiliates, Inc. company logo
Lawandales Planning Affiliates, Inc. - Planning for Community

 

Introduction

Value of Titusville

Photo of Downtown Titusville storefronts    Photo of Titusville Historic 

Courthouse    Photo of a historic house in Titusville
The value of Titusville is found in cultural assets including architecture, landscapes and landmarks. These cultural assets tell a story seen in the built environment of buildings, sidewalks and streets. It is a narrative of Titusville’s history as a center for Florida’s Indian River citrus industry, a historic transportation center as rail extended south into Florida, a stop along America’s Dixie Highway and more recently a hub for the space industry at nearby Kennedy Space Center. Titusville is a city with a history connected to agriculture, the river, the railroad and the highway.

Cultural resources and local traditions make Titusville distinctive. It is important that future economic development build upon existing assets, leveraging existing physical resources to encourage compatible development that increases economic prosperity for all citizens throughout the Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) district. 

This Urban Design Manual addresses how the built environment can influence the preservation of what is distinctive and unique about Titusville. Important characteristics include: a historic downtown commercial district; historic residential areas within walkable distance to downtown and the Indian River; nearby natural amenities like Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge; and the historic rail station. There is a low-scale mixed-use urban environment with retailers located in a pedestrian-friendly area. There are potential connections from the central commercial district to the marina area and residential areas.  Future development should spring from these assets and build places future generations will consider worthy to be preserved and maintained.

 

Purpose

Faded photo of the Julia Street courtyard in Downtown Titusville.

"A city with no limits, rich in tradition, peaceful lifestyles and great opportunities."

The Titusville Urban Design Manual offers aesthetic guidance in support of the City’s Land Development Regulations and is a tool for Titusville’s successful economic development. Th e aim is to provide a Manual that helps preserve and enhance Titusville’s distinctiveness as a coastal town with rich agricultural, natural and technological history. The Design Manual includes clear guidelines for both public and private entities to build and rehabilitate commercial, civic and residential buildings in the CRA. Th is guideline assumes the community goals of building on the value of Titusville’s built environment and to make Titusville a more walkable, active, sustainable and distinctive coastal town in Florida.
 

Guiding Principles of the Urban Design Manual

Stock photo of the storefront area of a city street.
  1. Reinforce distinctive cultural assets of Titusville’s built environment in future developments.
  2. Preserve and enhance Titusville’s historic context and sense of place.
  3. Create connections through:
    1. Pedestrian Oriented Design
    2. Compatible Infi ll Development
    3. Seamless Transitions Between Districts
  4. Titusville’s continued growth is dependent on a safe, healthy, comfortable environment for residents, business owners and visitors expressed via:
    1. Increased Mixed-use Development Density
    2. Sidewalks
    3. Signage
    4. Lighting
    5. Landscaping
    6. Aesthetically Pleasing Design
  5. Promote quality building.
  6. Create an economically vibrant CRA.
  7. Achieve environmental balance between the built and natural environments.
  8. Nourish vibrant cultural activity downtown through the built environment.

 

Goals of the Urban Design Manual

Stock photo of a retail storefront from a random city, showing people and cars out front.    Stock photo of a building in a city'd downtown area, with people and cars.
  1. Preserve and enhance Titusville’s unique attributes by guiding design for rehabilitation, adaptive reuse and new construction throughout the CRA.
  2. Provide guidance for retailers to express their brand and identity, increasing their visibility and aesthetic quality to pedestrians, cyclists and motorists in Titusville.
  3. Guide property owners in creating a sustainable, pedestrian-oriented mixed-use town for residents, business owners and visitors.
  4. Create stronger connections between districts, between downtown and the Indian River, between residents and commercial activity.
  5. Provide guidance for both public and private development to create a strong sense of time and place that reflects the cultural heritage of Titusville.
  6. Preserve and reinforce the remaining street blocks and service alley patterns as part of the urban fabric.

 

Architectural Styles

Several eclectic styles contribute to the character, context and sense of place in Titusville. Th is section serves as a reference for terms referred to in later pages of this design manual. Th e predominant characteristics of each style are:

Frame Vernacular
Photo of a house showing an example of the Frame Vernacular style

Commercial Storefronts
Photo of the former Kloiber's Cobbler restaurant storefront in Downtown Titusville.

​Bungalow/Craftsman
Photo of a house as an example of the Bungalow or Craftsman style

Beaux Arts Classical
Photo of the historic Titusville Bank building in Downtown Titusville.

​Gothic Revival
Photo of St. Gabriel's Episcopal Church, showing an example of Gothic 

Revival style.

Spanish Eclectic
Photo of a house surrounded by trees, with a car in the driveway, as an example of the Spanish Eclectic 

style

Neo-Classical
Photo of the historic Titusville Courthouse as an example of Neo-Classical style.

Queen Anne
Photo of the second floor of the yellow-colored Pritchard House, as an example of Queen Anne style

Colonial Revival (with variant Dutch Colonial)
Photo of a house as an example of Colonial Revival style.

Art Deco
Photo of a a building in Pasadena, California, as an example of Art Deco style.

Mission
Photo of a building in Downtown Titusville showing an example of the Mission style.

Masonry Vernacular
Photo of the Hardware storefront in Downtown Titusville showing an example of the Masonry Vernacular style.


 

Retail

Typical Downtown Titusville Retail Facade Elements

Photo of the Hardware building storefront with numbered locations to depict elements of downtown retail facade: 1- Signage and Lighting Location; 2- Window 

Signage; 3- Knee Wall; 4- Canopy and Awning Location; 5- Blade Sign Location - Hung under Canopy or just below Bulkhead; 6- Large Display Windows; 7- Recessed Entry
  1. Signage and Lighting Location
  2. Window Signage
  3. Knee wall
  4. Canopy and Awning Location
  5. Blade Sign Location;  Hung under Canopy or just below Bulkhead
  6. Large Display Windows
  7. Recessed Entry
Note: Although this is a downtown location, this retail facade exhibits characteristics that are applicable in each district of Titusville.
 

Retail

General Retail Facade Guidelines

The retail facade serves two purposes in Titusville. Retail facades should allow retailers to express their brand identity and strongly promote the viability and liveliness of downtown Titusville.

Facades should include typical retail facade elements and interpret the architectural style of the district in which they reside. No matter the district within the CRA, retail facades should adhere to the Guiding Principles for a Successful Retail Environment.

Stock photo taken under a covered walkway of a retail storefront along a city street, with people walking and cars parked along side.    Photo taken of a retail area along a road, at Christmas time, with snow on the ground.    
Photo taken of an Audio car dealership. (Photo by Saitama) Photo by Saitama
 
 

Retail

Guiding Principles for a Successful Retail Environment

  1. Retailers should express their unique identity and brand on the entire tenant facade.
  2. Display windows should be a prominent component of each retail facade.
  3. Entry should be emphasized and easily visible to pedestrians and motorists.
  4. Promote color and articulation in facade design.
  5. Signage should be visible from the sidewalk and roadway.
  6. Awnings and lighting should be used to provide a sense of comfort and safety for customers.
  7. Where appropriate, durable awnings, canopies and colonnades should be used to provide shade for display windows and storefront character.
  8. Sustainable considerations include durable, energy efficient and low impact materials.
Photo of people walking along a city sidewalk in front of stores, with palm trees and cars along the side.
 

Retail

Retail Illumination

Illumination is a critical element for retail environments. Lighting is important in promoting public safety and highlighting architectural features. 

Lighting design usually consists of two types:
Other lighting considerations should include: Photo of a retail store lit up at night.    Photo of a storefront along a busy 

city road, lit up at night, with people and cars going by.
 

Retail

Awnings and Canopies

Awnings and Canopies are encouraged for Mixed-use and retail facades. Th ese elements are helpful in blocking the sun and providing coverage for pedestrians in inclement weather. Th ey are used to mark building and store entrances and are an expression of retail identity.

Awnings:

Canopies:

For both awnings and canopies, use durable, low-impact materials.
Photo of a glass canopy over a retail business.
Canopy
Photo of an awning system over the front of a business.
Awning System

 

Signage

Signage Guiding Principles and Definitions

In addition to a well-designed and individual retail facade, signage is an important element for each retailer to advertise its location. Signage not only serves the needs of retailers, but it also establishes a vibrant built environment in Titusville.

A wide variety of signage types achieve these goals, however, not all are appropriate in every district of Titusville. Some areas of Titusville require signage that is focused on visibility to the pedestrian, while other districts should have signage that can be seen by pedestrians, cyclists and motorists.

Signs should clearly defi ne retail and commercial locations, addresses and districts in Titusville. In a mixed-use building, signs should help people identify appropriate entrances. For a commercial business located in a predominantly residential area, signs should be clearly visible and distinctive while respecting the overall character of the district. Signs should express local identity, even when the retailer is a national brand.

This manual defines several signage types here and provides more detail later for district specific signage.

General Sign Principles

  1. Signs should be pedestrian-oriented and visible to motorists.
  2. Architecture of the building should dictate placement of the signage.
  3. Signs should not conceal architectural features of the building.
  4. In every district, signs should respect the dominant characteristics of each district in scale, style, composition and placement.
  5. When illuminated, consider ENERGY STAR or energy efficient fixtures.
  6. Consider low impact sign materials.
  7. Durable, sustainable fabrication materials should be used in the construction of signs.
Photo of a vertical store sign attached to a pole in Downtown Titusville, that reads "Hotpoint."    Stock photo of a storefront sign in the shape of a coffee cup, which reads "Uncommon 

Grounds -  A Coffee House."
 

Signage - Types

Wall-Mounted Sign
Photo of sign which reads "Vitas" mounted on the side of a building.

Window Sign
Photo of a window sign which reads "Barnlight Electric."

Blade Sign
Photo of a sign hanging off of a building, which reads "Toby's Estate - Coffee Roasters - Brooklyn, NY."

Marquee Sign
Photo of a marquee sign on the side of a building which reads "Hotpoint - Appliances."

Monument Sign
Photo of a monument sign with a moon and stars, which reads "Moonlight."


 

Signage

Signage, Public Art and Illumination Guidelines

Depending on the District, the following types of signage are allowed in Titusville:

Discouraged sign elements:

Photo of a blade sign, depicting a red sock with a halo and wings standing on a cloud, with the words Sock Heaven on a yellow banner.
Blade Sign
Photo of a painted mural on the side of a brick building, showing a rabbit running through white flowers.
Mural (Photo by Dwwebber)
Photo of banners hanging from the side of a red brick building, with text saying mini bar.
Banner sign

 

Sustainability

Shade and Ventilation Design

Photo of a metal window shade over a window.
Window Shade
Photo of green vegetation and vines growing up the wall of an old brick building in a city.
Green Wall
Photo of a residential covered porch.
Porch
Photo of a person walking under a shaded structure called a colonnade.
Colonnade
Photo of a large, wooden shade propped up over a building's window.
Window Shade
Photo of vegetation growing up a building's wall, with a pedestrian bike sign in front.
Green Wall
Photo of open windows on a building.
Operable Windows
Photo of metal, horizontal shades on a window.
Sun Shades
Close-up photo of window blinds.
Window Blinds
 
 

Sustainability

Ground-based Stormwater and Runoff

Photo of a rain barrel alongside a house, with bushes growing around it.
Rain Barrel
Photo of a Smart Car parked on a grassy road shoulder.
Pervious Pavement
Photo of a cars parked alongside a vegetated area between a road and sidewalk, as a woman walks along the path.
Vegetated Swale
Photo of a paved area with sections of grass growing through.
Pervious Pavement
Photo of a patterned stone walkway with vegetation and a roadway alongside.
Vegetated Swale and Pervious Pavement
Photo of plants growing along a path.
Vegetated Swale
Photo of park benches surrounded by vegetation and a path.
Vegetated Swale and Pervious Surface
Photo of vegetation growing alongside a storm drain on a street.
Vegetated Swale
Photo looking down on benches surrounded by vegetation, in between buildings.
Vegetated Swale (Photo by Epler Hall)
Photo of two cars parked on a gravel surface.
Pervious Surface
Close-up photo of paving stones with grass growing in between.
Pervious Surface
  
 

Sustainability

Roof Stormwater and Runoff

Building roofs can be important in achieving reduced building energy use and decreasing stormwater runoff .
Photo of a building's roof with soil and plants growing on it.
Green Roof
Photo of many different plants growing in a garden on the roof of building.
Green Roof
Photo of vegetation growing on the roof of a building, with solar panels nearby.
Green Roof and Solar Panel
Photo of a coll roof on a building
Cool Roof
Photo of cool roofs on multiple residential buildings.
Cool Roof
Photo of a solar panel on the roof of a building.
Solar Panel

 

Landscape

Streetscape Landscape Standards

Vegetated Swales

Shading

Photo of vegetation between a road and a sidewalk.
Vegetated Swale
Photo of a city sidewalk with storefronts, benches, trees, and cars parked along the street.
 

Landscape

Typical Landscape Zones

Diagram of a typical street corner with different zones labeled: 1- On-Street Parking; 2- Landscape Zone; 3- Pedestrian Zone; 4- Building
Diagram of a typical street corner with different zones labeled: 1. On-Street Parking; 2. Landscape Zone; 3. Pedestrian Zone; 4. Building.
    Photo of a city sidewalk with trees and bushes along the side.

Photo of a woman pushing a child in a stroller along a city sidewalk.    
Photo of a vegetated swale.
Vegetated Swale
 Photo of cars parked on a roadside, with vegetation between the road and the sidewalk.   Photo of cars parked along a city street in front of stores.  
 

Landscape

Buffer Landscape Standards

Diagram of typical city corner with zones designated: 1- Conditional Use; 2- Buffer; 3- Single-Family Residential
Diagram of typical city corner with zones designated: 1. Conditional Use;
2. Buffer; 3. Single-Family Residential
Photo of a residential home surrounded by trees.    Photo of a Car Wash 

establishment surrounded by landscape bushes and trees.  
 

Street Furniture

Street and Site Furniture

Street furniture is an important tool for creating a pedestrian environment on the street. Uniform street furniture adds to a coherent, continuous, identifi able streetscape. It also adds amenities to the environment by providing places to sit and rest, receptacles for trash and recyclables, and a secure place to lock bicycles.

Guidelines:
Photo of trees and bushes in a Downtown Titusville courtyard.    Photo of 

trees, bushes, trashcans and benches in a Downtown Titusville courtyard.    Photo of 

concrete structures with trees and benches which used to be in Titusville's Julia Street Courtyard.
 
 

Design Review

Administration, Submittals and Review Process (as taken from the Land Development Regulations)

To be determined with City Attorney.
 

District Map
 

Map showing the different districts in Downtown Titusville. Light Blue = Civic Waterfront; Orange = Uptown; Purple = Downtown; Red = Midtown; 

Yellow = Historic Residential
Map showing the different districts in Downtown Titusville. Light Blue = Civic Waterfront; Orange = Uptown; Purple = Downtown; Red = Midtown; Yellow = Historic Residential

Map Legend with Districts Designate as follows: Light Blue = Civic Waterfront; Orange = Uptown; Purple = Downtown; Red = Midtown; 

Yellow = Historic Residential
 


 

Uptown District Guidelines

Close-up of map area showing Titusville's Uptown District.
 

Uptown District Guidelines

Architectural Style

Located adjacent to downtown and with many opportunities for redevelopment, the Uptown District should be well connected in style to the Downtown District. Th is can include buildings with contemporary styles that reflect:​
Photo of a busy city street with a retail building. (Photo by Payton Chung)
Photo by Payton Chung
Photo of a building with cars parked in front.    Photo of buildings along a 

busy city street with cars driving past.
 

Uptown District Guidelines

Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

Style

Massing and Siting

Materials


Photo of a building.    Photo of a building as a bicyclist rides by.Photo of a building as cars drive past.
 

Uptown District Guidelines

District Edges

Development on blocks adjacent to another District or the CRA boundary should reflect a transition in height and density. Where the two districts’ boundaries intersect, there should be no more than 30’ of building height difference between the adjoining districts. Mid-block changes in height and bulk should occur to relate to the adjacent district.

The Downtown District and Civic Waterfront District should be allowed to meet the heights of the buildings at the edge of the Uptown District. 


Photo of a red brick building in a city with cars parked nearby.   
Photo of a building with a lot of windows, with cars parked out front. (Photo by Payton Chung)
Photo by Payton Chung
   Photo of a brick building on a 

busy city street.
 

Uptown District Guidelines

Retail Identity

Architecture

Materials

Photo looking down the sidewalk in front on retail stores on a city street, with a woman in a white dress walking. (Photo by La Citta Vitta)
Photo by La Citta Vitta
Photo looking at a restaurant storefront with a red and white striped awning.    Photo looking at a storefront with a sign that reads "Artifactory."
Photo of a storefront with the name "Chico's" mounted on the wall.    Photo looking down a covered walkway in front of stores, with a man leaning against a pillar and a sign overhead reading "Marilyn & Monroe's Men & Women's 

Shoes."
 

Uptown District Guidelines

Signage Idea Gallery

Signage allowed in the Uptown District:
Example of a red-block Blade Sign on the side of a building.
Blade Sign
Example of a painted mural and banner sign depiction bicycles, on the side of a yellow building.
Mural & Banner sign
Photo showing lights hung under a colonnade.
Lights under a colonnade.
Photo showing an orange banner sign with the words "The Soho House" hanging on the side of a red-brick building.
Banner sign
Photo showing an example of a window sign.
Window sign
Photo showing a blade sign which reads "Cabanas 9B Rooms 9500-9657."
Blade sign
Photo showing a storefront using both a blade sign and window sign.
Blade sign & Window sign
Photo showing a window sign that reads "Kincaid's Hamburgers."
Window sign
Photo showing an illuminated blade sign which reads "BB King's Blues Club."
Blade sign
Photo of a wall-mounted sign.
Wall-mounted sign

 

Downtown District Guidelines

Close-up of map area showing Titusville's Downtown District.
 

Downtown District Guidelines

Architectural Style

This district has the richest architectural history and expresses the evolution of downtown Titusville since its downtown burned in the late 19th Century.  This can include styles that reflect Photo showing a building with cars parked along the street out front.    Photo showing a red-brick building. 
Photo showing a multi-story retail building with people and cars out front.    Photo showing a building with cars out front.
 

Downtown District Guidelines

Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

Style

Massing and Siting

Materials

Photo of buildings on a busy city street. (Photo by Payton Chung)
Photo by Payton Chung
Photo of buildings on a busy city street.    Photo of people crossing a street 

in front of retail buildings.
Photo of buildings with window-box planters. (Photo by Payton Chung)
Photo by Payton Chung

 

Downtown District Guidelines

District Edges

Development on blocks adjacent to another District or the CRA boundary should reflect 
a transition in height and density.  Where the two districts’ boundaries intersect, there should be no more than 30’ of building height difference between the adjoining districts.  Mid-block changes in height and bulk should occur to relate to the adjacent district, including transitions to the Downtown Historic Village.

Buildings on the edge of the Uptown District should be 5 stories to rise up to meet the height of the Uptown District. 

As buildings approach the Historic Residential District edge, thoughtful development should relate to the scale of the adjoining block of the District. Buildings can be up to 5 stories in height on this edge, however, design and use should address the residential nature of the adjacent district.
Photo of a downtown city street with cars parked and people walking in front of retail buildings.
    Photo of downtown city street with cars parked and people walking in front of retail buildings.
Photo showing a building on a downtown city street corner.    Photo showing a 

building in a city's downtown area.
Photo showing buildings in a downtown historic area as an example of transitioning building heights.
Transition to Downtown Historic Village heights. (Photo by Payton Chung)

 

Downtown District Guidelines

Retail Identity

Architecture

Materials

Photo of the front door of a retail store, with the name "Reference" on the wall.    Photo looking down a colonnade as people walk in front of stores.
Photo of a woman standing in front of a store named "West Elm."    Photo showing the front entrance to a Guess store.
 

Downtown District Guidelines

Signage Idea Gallery

Signage allowed in the Downtown District include:
Photo of the Paramount Theater sign as an example of a marquee sign with LED lights.
Marquee sign with LED lights
Photo of a banner sign on the side of a building.
Banner sign
Photo of a blade sign which reads "River Bar &"
Blade sign
Photo of a wall-mounted sign with stars and red, white and blue colors, which reads "Allstar Collectibles."
Wall-mounted sign
Photo of a marquee sign which reads "Legal Seafoods."
Marquee sign
Photo of a marquee sign which reads "Greenmount."
Marquee sign
Photo of a window sign in the shape of a red star with the words "Electric Works San Francisco."
Window sign

 

Civic Waterfront District Guidelines

Close-up of map area showing Titusville's Civic Waterfront District.
 

Civic Waterfront District Guidelines

Architectural Style

This district is the Marina District and reflects functional maritime and recreational uses.

Photo of a waterfront building with a pier.    Photo of a busy waterfront 

retail area with people strolling the boardwalk.    Photo of a marina with boats and a 

boardwalk.Photo of a pier with a restaurant.
 

Civic Waterfront District Guidelines

Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

Style

Massing and Siting

Materials

Photo of a marina with many boats.   Photo of a 

waterfront boardwalk and pier.
 

Civic Waterfront District Guidelines

District Edges

Development on blocks adjacent to another District or the CRA boundary should reflect a transition in height and density. Where the two districts boundaries intersect, there should be no more than 30’ of building height difference between the adjoining districts. Mid-block changes in height and bulk should occur to relate to the adjacent district.

Buildings on the edge of the Uptown and Downtown Districts should transition in height 
to meet the heights in those Districts.
Photo of a park area with colorful flowers.
    Photo of a grassy field 

with buildings in the background.   Photo of a jogging path in a city.Photo of sail boats in the bay.
 

Civic Waterfront District Guidelines

Retail Identity

Architecture

Materials

Photo of people sitting at an outside restaurant along the waterfront.    Photo 

of people walking and biking in front of retail stores.   Photo of a marina in a downtown 

area.
Photo of a large sign with the name Pier Park Panama City Beach Florida.
Photo of a walkway in front of retail stores with a sign which reads "Brooks Shoes for Kids."
 

Civic Waterfront District Guidelines

Signage Idea Gallery

Signage allowed in the Civic Waterfront
Photo of a marquee sign which reads "Citi Performing Arts Center Tickets."
LED Marquee sign
Photo of a wall-mounted sign with the letter W inside a circle.
Wall-mounted sign
Photo of a banner sign that reads "Ann Taylor."
Banner sign
Photo of a banner sign that reads "Victoria's Secret."
Banner sign
Photo of a window sign that read "BellJar Gorgeous Little Things."
Window sign
Photo of a blade sign that reads "Pure Beauty Hair Skin Body."
Blade sign
Photo of a wall-mounted sign that reads "Hoggy's Barn & Grille."
Wall-mounted sign
Photo of a blade sign with dogs on it and words saying "Dog Savvy."
Blade sign
Photo of a wall-mounted sign for a Virgin Megastore.
Wall-mounted sign
Photo of a marquee sign that reads "King's Fish House."
Marquee sign

 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

Close-up of map area showing Titusville's Civic Waterfront District.
 
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

Architectural Style

This district has the richest residential architectural history and expresses Titusville’s cultural history. Most buildings are single family residential. Influential styles include:  Photo of a house typical of the Historic Residential District of Titusville   Rendering of a house typically found in Titusville's Historic Residential District.
Photo of a house in the Historic Residential District of Titusville.  Typical design of a house in the Historic Residential District.
 
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

Style

Massing and Siting

Materials

Photo of a white house. (Photo by Old Northeast Walks)
Photo by Old Northeast Walks
Photo of a green house. (Photo by Old Northeast Walks)
Photo by Old Northeast Walks
Photo of a multi-story green house.   Photo of a light blue house with stairs leading up to it.
 
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

District Edges

Development on blocks adjacent to another District or the CRA boundary should reflect a transition in height and density. Where the two districts’ boundaries intersect, there should be no more than 30’ of building height difference between the adjoining districts. Mid-block changes in height and bulk should occur to relate to the adjacent district.

The blocks that border the Downtown District should step up in height.  The blocks that are adjacent to the Midtown District should be 2-3 stories.

Uses on these two district edges are an appropriate location for small multi-family buildings within the Downtown and Midtown Districts.

Photo of a three-story brick apartment building with cars out front.   Photo of the Broome Law Firm building in Titusville.
Photo of a brown house with people on the front porch. (Photo by Kimke)
Photo by Kimke
 
 

Historic Residential District Guidelines

Retail Identity

Architecture

Materials

 Photo of a multi-story building with bottom floor stores and cars out front.   Photo of a restaurant with tables outside.Photo of people walking through a colonnade.
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Map
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Architectural Style

This district is largely suburban in nature. These styles include architecture suited for auto repair shops; industrial buildings; auto sale lots; frame, brick vernacular, bungalow and mission style homes housing either residential or commercial uses.

Photo of a two-story retail building in Titusville's Midtown District.   Photo of a car dealership in the Midtown District, with a stylized angular covering.
A white mission-style home in the Midtown District of Titusville.   Photo of a motel in the Midtown District of Titusville.
Photo of an older mission-style building in the Midtown District of Titusville.
 
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Compatible Infill, Additions and Renovations

Style

Massing and Siting

Materials

Photo of a multi-story brick building with an elevated walkway leading to doors.   
Photo of a concrete and glass, multi-story building with trees and cars in front. (Photo by La Citta Vitta)
Photo by La Citta Vitta
 
Photo of a Smart car dealership, with a yellow Smart car parked in front. (Photo by Bergstrom)
Photo by Bergstrom
Photo of existing retail building before any renovation.
Existing Conditions
Artist rendering showing the same retail building after a theoretical renovation.
After storefront renovations, addition of street trees and landscaping, and development of a plaza.
 
 

Midtown District Guidelines

District Edges

Development on blocks adjacent to another District or the CRA boundary should reflect a transition in height and density. Where the two districts boundaries intersect, there should be no more than 30’ of building height difference between the adjoining districts where boundaries include a right-of-way. 

Buildings on the edge of the Downtown District should be 3 stories in height to relate to the buildings in the Downtown District.  Any lot that abuts a single family home in the Historic Residential District can be no more than 3 stories in height. These lots should also include a landscape buffer adjacent to the District boundary.

Architecture and access should respect the residential nature of the adjacent District.
Photo of a mult-story retail building along a city street.   Photo of a multi-story retail building along a street lined with cars.   Photo of a multi-story brick apartment building with cars parked along the street in front and  police car nearby.
Photo of a three-story retail building on a city street.   Photo of a multi-story retail building on a city corner.   Photo of a three-story office building on a city corner.


 
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Retail Identity

Architecture

Materials

Photo of a large retail store at a busy intersection.    Photo of a retail building "The Container Store" with cars parked out front.
Photo of people walking under a colonnade while shopping.   Photo of an exotic car dealership on a city corner.

 
 

Midtown District Guidelines

Signage Idea Gallery

Signage allowed in Midtown:
Photo of a Buick marquee sign.
Marquee sign
Photo of a monument sign on dirt.
Monument sign
Photo of a large monument sign with a dragon fly element attached, saying "Discovery Center & Murfee Spring Wetland."
Monument sign
Photo of a monument sign made to look like stacked blocks with letters on them.
Monument sign
Photo of a window sign that says "Barnlight Electric."
Window sign
Photo of large monument sign with a Ford logo on top, which reads "Shanahan."
Monument sign
Photo of a monument sign with yellow on it and an M for Metro. (Photo by La Citta Vitta)
Monument sign (Photo by La Citta Vitta)
Photo of a monument sign with a silver rectangle and the words "700 Drayton food|music|drinks."
Monument sign

 

Approved Native Plant List of the City of Titusville

Street Trees:

Featured Palms:



 

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