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Water Emergencies after 5 p.m. (321) 383-5657
2836 Garden Street
Titusville, FL 32796
Phone: (321) 567-3855
Fax: (321) 383-5653
Contact: Water Resources Administration
Email: 
Hours: Monday - Friday; 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
The City of Titusville, Florida / Water Resources / PUBLIC NOTICES - Drinking Water - 2018

Public Notices - Drinking Water - 2018

Important Information About Your Drinking Water

The City of Titusville water system adjusts the pH, alkalinity, and total hardness of its drinking water in order to control corrosion. Corrosion in water systems is defined as the electrochemical interaction between a metal surface such as a pipe wall and water.

We routinely monitor your water for the water quality parameters (WQPs): pH, alkalinity and total hardness to confirm that we are adequately controlling corrosion. During the periods July – December, 2017; January – June, 2018; and July – October, 2018, our system’s alkalinity level was outside the recommended optimal range for this parameter and as such did not meet the treatment technique requirements for alkalinity. This is a drinking water technique violation. It is considered a Treatment Technique Violation of the federal Lead and Copper Rule if a water system operates with WQPs outside of its recommended optimal range for more than nine days.

As our customer, you have a right to know what happened, what you should do, and what we did to correct this situation.

A recent record-keeping change revealed that although we had monitored for alkalinity as required, our system’s alkalinity level was at times above the optimal range, which means it may have provided more corrosion control than necessary. Having alkalinity levels above the WQP indicated that our water treatment needed to be adjusted. We adjusted our treatment on October 15, 2018, and we will continue monitor plant operations to maintain water quality parameters.

There is nothing you need to do. We have adjusted the amount of Quicklime used in our water treatment process, which adjusted our pH and alkalinity levels, bringing our alkalinity level to within the optimal water quality parameter range. We will continue to monitor plant operations to maintain water quality parameters.

What does this mean? This was not an emergency. If it had been, you would have been notified within 24 hours. During the period that the treatment was out of adjustment, it is possible that lead and/or copper could have leached from plumbing components into the water. We do not know the amount, if any, of lead and/or copper that may have leached into the water. As shown below, Titusville’s lead and copper monitoring results for 2018, and historically, are well below regulated levels.

 

Our Results

The Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) establishes action levels of 0.015 mg/L for lead and 1.3 mg/L for copper in public water systems. The lead or copper action level is exceeded if the concentration in more than 10 percent of water samples (i.e., the 90th percentile level) collected is greater than the respective action level.

During 2018, Titusville conducted 240 lead and copper analysis from 120 water samples collected from customer taps during two sampling periods. Our 90th percentile level for lead was <.006 and 0.004 mg/L. Our 90th percentile level for copper was 0.102 and 0.085 mg/L. These results are well under regulated levels and are consistent with Titusville’s historical lead and copper monitoring results.

Action Level (AL): The level which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow.

Some people who drink water containing specific contaminants could become seriously ill. Health effects language for individual contaminants can be obtained by visiting the EPA website at
https://www.ecfr.gov/cgi-bin/text-idx?SID=c075a7243829807472f26dfc79367b2e&mc=true &node=ap40.25.141_1211.b& rgn=div9.

Understanding the LCR

The Lead and Copper Rule (LCR) is a treatment technique regulation under the Safe Drinking Water Act that was established by U. S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) to minimize lead and copper levels in drinking water. It requires water utilities to monitor both lead and copper at customer taps. The LCR is concerned with controlling the release of lead and copper from pipes into drinking water. To control this release, the LCR establishes a treatment technique that includes requirements for corrosion control treatment by water utilities. Corrosion in water systems is defined as the electrochemical interaction between a metal surface such as pipe wall or solder and water. Corrosion control treatment typically involves the chemical adjustment of drinking water to reduce the corrosivity of drinking water and thus reduce the leaching of lead and copper from plumbing materials. Alkalinity and pH adjustment are used by many systems for corrosion control. The City of Titusville water system adjusts the pH, alkalinity, and total hardness of its drinking water in order to control corrosion.
 

Understanding Alkalinity & pH

The City of Titusville water system routinely monitor your water for the water quality parameters (WQPs): pH, alkalinity and total hardness. Alkalinity and pH are properties of water. Alkalinity is a measure of the capacity of water to neutralize acids, while pH is a measure of its acidity. Water’s pH influences many corrosion-related parameters, including alkalinity. Corrosion in water systems is defined as the electrochemical interaction between a metal surface such as a pipe wall and water. Alkaline compounds in the water such as bicarbonates, carbonates, and hydroxides lower the acidity of the water. Water with low levels of alkalinity are more likely to be corrosive. Water with high levels of alkalinity are more likely to contribute to scale (lime buildup) in plumbing, thus reducing the interaction between metal pipes and the water that travels through them.

 

For additional information contact Gene DeMayo, Water Production Superintendent at (321) 567-3877, 2836 Garden Street, Titusville, FL.

 

 



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The City of Titusville, Florida
P. O. Box 2806, (32781-2806) - 555 S. Washington Avenue - Titusville, FL 32796 - Phone: (321) 567-3775 - Fax: (321) 383-5704 - Site by Project A

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