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Children Act Fast...So Do Poisons!

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Poison Prevention

MARCH 16-22, 2014

 

Poison Logo

By Public Law 87-319, the third week of March was nationally designated by President John F. Kennedy in 1961 as Poison Prevention Week.  Congress intended this event as a means for local communities to raise awareness of the dangers of unintentional poisonings and to take measures to prevent poisoning.

Titusville Fire and Emergency Services urges its community members to pay special attention to the dangers of poisoning.  One of the basic themes of National Poison Prevention Week is "Children Act Fast...So Do Poisons!".  Parents must always be watchful when household chemicals or drugs are being used.  Many incidents happen when adults are using a product but are distracted (for example, by the telephone or doorbell) for a few moments.  Children act fast, and adults must make sure that potentially poisonous products are stored away from children at all times.

If you know your child has ingested a poison, immediate steps should be taken.

1.  Remain calm.  Not all medicines and household chemicals are poisonous, and not all exposures necessarily result in a poisoning.

2.  For medicines and household chemicals, call the national poison control center immediately at 1-800-222-1222; they are familiar with the toxicity (how poisonous it is) of most substances found in the home or know how to find this information)  and are available 24-hours-a-day, 7-days-a-week.  If unable to contact the poison control center, call 9-1-1.

3.  Be prepared to give the facts (described below) and have the label ready when you call.  The label provides information concerning the product's contents and advice on what immediate first aid to perform.

If you found your child playing with a bottle of medicine or some household products but you are unsure if the child has swallowed some:

1.  Remain calm.

2.  Reactions vary, depending on the product.

3.  Be cautious; some products cause no immediate sysmptoms.

4.  If you suspect, but don't know for sure your child has ingested a potentially hazardous product, calll the poison control center right away.  Be prepared to give the facts noted in the prior segment and follow their recommendations.  If you can't reach the poison control center, call 9-1-1.

How to prevent poisonings.

  1. Use child-resistant packaging properly by closing the container securely after use.
  2. Keep all chemicals and medicines locked up and out of sight.  Never store them under sinks, in purses or on countertops that are within the reach of children. These include cleaning products, solvents, medicines (prescription and non-prescription), plants, alcohol products and some cosmetics.
  3. Call the poison center 1-800-222-1222 immediately in case of poisoning.
  4. When products are in use, never let young children out of your sight, even if you must take the child or product along when answering the phone or doorbell.
  5. Keep items in original containers.
  6. Leave the original labels on all products, and read the label before using.
  7. Do not put decorative lamps and candles that contain lamp oil where children can reach them because lamp oil is very toxic.
  8. Always leave the light on when giving or taking medicine. Check the dosage every time.
  9. Avoid taking medicine in front of children. Refer to medicine as "medicine," not "candy."
  10. Clean out the medicine cabinet periodically, and safely dispose of unneeded medicines when the illness for which they were prescribed is over. Dispose of them as recommended by your area's solid waste and water departments, and rinse the container before discarding.
  11. In order to prevent ingestion of miniature batteries, consumers should keep the batteries out of children's reach and throw away old batteries, securely wrapped, after they have been removed from the appliance.

For more information on poison prevention measures, contact Life Safety Specialist Heather Gilmore at Titusville Fire and Emergency Services, 383-5708 or http://www.poisonprevention.org/

 





P. O. Box 2806, (32781-2806) - 555 S. Washington Avenue - Titusville, FL 32796 - Phone: (321) 567-3775 - Fax: (321) 383-5704 - Site by Project A