The following addresses are under a precautionary boil water notice: 3445 Ronald McNair Way, 3353, 3343, 3323, 3293, 3045 (units A101 through A109), 3055 (units B104 through B10, B115, B117), 3065 (units C101, C104, C106, C107), 3135 Suites 101 and 102, 3155, 3125, 2965, 2955, 2940 Columbia Blvd.
 
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The City of Titusville, Florida / Fire & Emergency Services / Frequently Asked Questions / General

Frequently Asked Questions - Fire & Emergency Services
General

Q: When I call 9-1-1 in Titusville, the Police Department answers. Why?

A: 

There are multiple Public Safety Answering Points (PSAP) at law enforcement centers within Brevard County.  When 9-1-1 is dialed, the call is connected to the appropriate PSAP for that locality.  In Titusville your call will be answered by the Titusville Police Department Dispatching Center, which also dispatches calls for Titusville Fire Department. 

If you also require medical transport, the call will be simultaneously transmitted to the Brevard County Public Safety Department who handles ambulance transports within our county.



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Q: Why did the fire department place those blue markers in the middle of my street?

A: 

At night, it is very difficult for our fire engines to spot fire hydrants placed along the road.  The placement of the markers corresponds with the location of the fire hydrant on your street.  The blue markers are highly reflective of vehicle lights and make it very easy for our firefighters to immediately find the hydrant's location, even if it is masked by overgrown weeds or shrubbery.

 

To minimize damage by vehicles passing over them, the markers are placed in the middle of the street where the majority of vehicles do not travel.



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Q: Does it cost me anything when I call 9-1-1 for an emergency?

A: 

All fire, medical, vehicle accidents and service calls responded to by Titusville Fire and Emergency Services are at no cost to our community members.  However, transportation provided by ambulance crews of Brevard County Public Safety Department and, transports under rare circumstances by our department, do incur costs for such emergency transportatioin.

 

Department responses to certain hazardous materials calls also may be chargeable, depending upon the type, scope and length of the hazmat call.



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Q: Why does a fire truck show up when I call for a medical emergency?

A: 

Titusville Fire and Emergency Services is an Advanced Life Support (ALS) First Responder agency and each of its fire stations maintain licensed Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians.  By setting up our fire engines to handle all types of calls, including medical emergencies, we can not only typically arrive on the scene faster than an ambulance because of strategically placed fire stations, but can also provide required advanced emergency medical care.

 

 



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Q: Who do I report a leaking fire hydrant to?

A: Repairs to fire hydrants are handled by the City's Water Sewer Field Operations Division.  They can be reached at 567-3855 to report any leaks or other maintenance issues.


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Q: What is Titusville's ISO (insurance service organization) rating?

A: 

Titusville's current ISO rating is 3.

Traditionally, the insurance industry has utilized a fire protection ISO rating as one of the factors they use in determining commercial and residential fire insurance rates charged to consumers.  Ratings of fire departments are administered approximately every 10 years.  The rating surveys a variety of factors including water supply infrastructure, types and maintenance of protection equipment, firefighting staffing and training, station locations, dispatching systems, etc.  Fire departments are then assigned an ISO rating, beginning with the highest of 1 through the lowest of 10.  Titusville's rating of 3 is very desirable and unusual for a community of our size.  The ISO rating of a community can have an impact on economic development as it relates to potential insurance costs for doing business within that community.



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Q: Why is it important for Titusville to maintain under a 5-minute response time?

A: 

Currently, Titusville Fire and Emergency Services maintains 4-minute averaged response time from initial receipt of the 9-1-1 call for emergency service.  Response times relate directly to the level of service provided by a fire/rescue department.  Two elements that rapid response time can influence are fire flash-over and medical injuries.

FIRES/FIRE RESCUES:  The initial period need for fires to build to intolerable temperatures is around 4 minutes (dependent upon fire loads and fire fuels present).  From 4 minutes to 8 minutes of duration, ire temperatures can triple to over 1,200 degrees.  This can create a phenomenon known as flash-over.  With the intense heat, the fire then begins to generate its own wind system, which adds to the intensity and rapidity of the fire and its effect.  One of the keys to rapid fire intervention, rescue, minimization of damage to the structure, and optimal safety to firefighting personnel is to arrive quickly and prevent the fire from rapidly increasing in its intensity and damage potential.

MEDICAL RESPONSES:  A minimal response time of 4 minutes or less has a direct correlation to successful intervention and quality of life in emergency medical situations.  The advent of emergency medicine in the early 1970's was due to the recognition of the importance of rapid medical intervention. 

In cases where application of CPR is required, the 4-minute time line is critical in the chain of survival of a patient.  After just a few minutes, the capability to revive someone from death diminishes rapidly.  Brain tissue, which is not capable of regenerating, begins to die after 4 minutes without oxygen, so the longer a patient goes without being resuscitated, the more the quality of life may be significantly affected if they are eventually revived. 

In trauma cases, the life-saving time from serious injury to hospital treatment is often referred to as the golden hour--the best chance for a patient's viability and survivability lies in how rapid the patient can be assessed and initially treated on scene by the first-responding emergency agency in the field, transported to the medical facility, and emergency treatment initiated within the hospital emergency department.



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Q: What's the difference between ALS (Advanced Life Support) and BLS (Basic Life Support)?

A: 

In 2005, Titusville Fire and Emergency Services completed a 7-year initiative to upgrade our emergency medical response level from BLS to ALS, to provide enhanced and life-saving emergency medical care for our citizens.

Basic Life Support (BLS)
  • Firefighter certified at Emergency Medical Technician level of training (255 hours of training)
  • Typically performs external procedures on patients
  • Cannot establish IV's, administer drugs and medications, (with the exception of very limited specific items)
  • Primarily serves in a support role to the Paramedic

 

 Advanced Life Support (ALS)
  • Firefighter certified at Paramedic level of training (1500 hours of training) which includes pediatric advanced life support, advanced cardiac life support, international trauma life support and neo-natal life support
  • Specially trained in advanced medical and trauma procedures, such as tracheal intubations, chest decompression, surgical cricothyrotomy and escharotomy for severe burns
  • Allowed to establish IV's and administer specialized medications
  • Specially trained in 12-lead ECG interpretations

 



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P. O. Box 2806, (32781-2806) - 555 S. Washington Avenue - Titusville, FL 32796 - Phone: (321) 567-3775 - Fax: (321) 383-5704 - Site by Project A